Session

Active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer: What do we still need to know?

Poster Session 60

  • Location:
    Room Madrid, North Hall (Level 1)
  • Chairs:
     A.R. Azzouzi, Angers (FR)
     M.R. Cooperberg, San Francisco (US)
     N. Suardi, Milan (IT)
  • Aims and objectives of this session

    The aim of this session is to highlight lights and shadows of active surveillance and how to improve current protocols

  • Poster viewing of 20 minutes. Presentations will take place on stage. Standard presentations are 2 minutes in length, followed by 2 minutes for discussion. Extended presentations (*) are 3 minutes in length, followed by 3 minutes for discussion.
793
The spatial distribution of positive cores predicts outcomes of active surveillance in very low risk prostate cancer patients

By: Erickson A.1, Vasarainen H.2, Mirtti T.3, Rannikko A.2

Institutes: 1University of Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Helsinki, Finland, 2University of Helsinki, Dept. of Urology, Helsinki, Finland, 3University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Dept. of Pathology, Helsinki, Finland

794
Variation in the use of active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer

By: Löppenberg B.1, Friedlander D.1, Tam A.1, Von Landenberg N.1, Gild P.1, Leow J.2, Krasnova A.1, Kibel A.1, Noldus J.3, Menon M.4, Sun M.1, Trinh Q-D.1

Institutes: 1Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Division of Urologic Surgery and Center For Surgery and Public Health, Boston, United States of America, 2Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Dept. of Urology, Singapore, Singapore, 3Marien Hospital Herne, Ruhr-University Bochum, Dept. of Urology, Herne, Germany, 4Henry Ford Health System, VUI Center for Outcomes Research, Analytics and Evaluation, Vattikuti Urology Institute, Detroit, United States of America

795
PTEN status in diagnostic biopsies predicts active surveillance rebiopsy Gleason upgrade, treatment change and adverse surgical histopathological findings

By: Erickson A.1, Lokman U.2, Vasarainen H.2, Mirtti T.3, Rannikko A.2

Institutes: 1University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Helsinki, Finland, 2University of Helsinki, Dept. of Urology, Helsinki, Finland, 3University of Helsinki, Dept. of Pathology, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, Helsinki, Finland

796
Risk-based selection for active surveillance: Results of the Movember Foundation’s Global Action Plan prostate cancer active surveillance (GAP3) initiative

By: Nieboer D.1, Steyerberg E.1, Bruinsma S.2, Bangma C.2, Roobol M.2

Institutes: 1Erasmus MC, Dept. of Public Health, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2Erasmus MC, Dept. of Urology, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

797
Pathological findings at radical prostatectomy after initial active surveillance in low-risk prostate cancer patients. Did we miss the chance to cure?

By: Suardi N.1, Luzzago S.1, Dell’Oglio P.1, Fossati N.1, Gandaglia G.1, Zaffuto E.1, Gaboardi F.1, Doglioni C.2, Freschi M.2, Scattoni V.1, Stabile A.1, Montorsi F.1, Briganti A.1

Institutes: 1Vita-Salute University San Raffaele, Dept. of Urology, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute University San Raffaele, Dept. of Pathology, Milan, Italy

798
Outcomes after deferred radical prostatectomy for men initially managed with active surveillance

By: Arnsrud Godtman R.1, Schafferer M.2, Stranne J.2, Hugosson J.2

Institutes: 1Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy At The University of Göteborg, Dept. of Urology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy At The University of Gothenburg, Dept. of Urology, Gothenburg, Sweden

799
Compliance of prostate cancer patients on active surveillance to protocol criteria: The experience of a large mono-institutional population

By: Badenchini F.1, Palorini F.1, Alvisi M.F.1, Marenghi C.1, Tulli Baldoin E.1, Nicolai N.2, Salvioni R.2, Catanzaro M.2, Stagni S.2, Tesone A.2, Torelli T.2, Villa S.3, Bedini N.4, Avuzzi B.4, Morlino S.4, Colecchia M.5, Messina A.6, Bellardita L.1, Magnani T.1, Rancati T.1, Valdagni R.7

Institutes: 1Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Prostate Cancer Program, Milan, Italy, 2Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept. of Urology, Milan, Italy, 3Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept. of Radiation Oncology , Milan, Italy, 4Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Milan, Italy, 5Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept. of Anatomo-Pathology, Milan, Italy, 6Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept of. Radiology, Milan, Italy, 7Università Degli Studi Di Milano & Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Dept. of Hematology and Hemato-Oncology & Prostate Cancer Program & Radiation Oncology , Milan, Italy

800
Variation in prostate cancer care at commission on cancer designated facilities

By: Löppenberg B.1, Sood A.2, Deepansh D.2, Karaborn P.3, Sammon J.4, Vetterlein M.5, Noldus J.1, Peabody J.2, Trinh Q-D.6, Menon M.2, Abdollah F.2

Institutes: 1Ruhr-University Bochum, Marien Hospital Herne, Dept. of Urology, Herne, Germany, 2Center For Outcomes Research, Analytics and Evaluation, Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Hosp, Dept. of Urology, Detroit, United States of America, 3Henry Ford Hospital, Dept. of Public Health Sciences, Detroit, United States of America, 4Maine Medical Center, Division of Urology & Center For Outcomes Research, Portland, United States of America, 5University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dept. of Urology, Hamburg, United States of America, 6Center For Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Division of Urology, Boston, United States of America

801
Multiparametric MRI represents an added value but not a substitute of follow-up biopsies in patients on active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer

By: Luzzago S.1, Suardi N.1, Dell’Oglio P.1, Cardone G.2, Gandaglia G.1, Esposito A.2, De Cobelli F.2, Cristel G.2, Kinzikeeva E.1, Freschi M.3, Gaboardi F.1, Del Maschio A.2, Montorsi F.1, Briganti A.1

Institutes: 1Vita-Salute University San Raffaele, Dept. of Urology, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute University San Raffaele, Dept. of Radiology, Milan, Italy, 3Vita-Salute University San Raffaele, Dept. of Pathology, Milan, Italy

802
Introducing mpMRI into contemporary UK active surveillance for localised prostate cancer

By: Bryant R.1, Yang B.1, Philippou Y.1, Lam K.1, Obiakor M.1, Ayers J.B.1, Gleeson F.2, Macpherson R.2, Verrill C.3, Roberts I.3, Leslie T.1, Crew J.1, Sooriakumaran P.1, Hamdy F.1, Brewster S.1

Institutes: 1Oxford University Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust, Dept. of Urology, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2Oxford University Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust, Dept. of Radiology, Oxford, United Kingdom, 3Oxford University Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust, Dept. of Pathology, Oxford, United Kingdom

* 803
MRI as a follow up tool in active surveillance – results from an MRI-defined active surveillance cohort (387 men, median 5 year follow up)

By: Retter A.1, Giganti F.1, Kirkham A.1, Allen C.1, Punwani S.1, Emberton M.2, Moore C.2

Institutes: 1University College London Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, London, United Kingdom, 2University College London Hospital, Dept. of Urology, London, United Kingdom

* 804
Metastases and death after 15 year of follow-up in men with screen-detected low-risk prostate cancer treated with protocol based active surveillance, radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy

By: Verbeek J., Drost F-J., Bangma C., Roobol M.

Institutes: Erasmus MC, Dept. of Urology, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Summary

To be confirmed